Sleep Research Society &

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Undergraduate, Graduate and Postgraduate Training Opportunities 

in Basic and Clinical Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine

2001 - V Edition

 

Home Page

Laboratories

 

 

 

 

 

Institution

University of Rochester

Address

Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, & Psychology

University of Rochester

300 Crittenden Blvd.

Rochester, New York 14642

USA

Faculty (Name, Email address)

Donna E. Giles, Ph.D. Donna_Giles@urmc.rochester.edu

Michael L. Perlis, Ph.D. Michael_Perlis@urmc.rochester.edu

Michael T. Smith, Ph.D. Michael_Smith@urmc.rochester.edu

Donald W. Greenblatt, M.D. Strong Sleep Disorders Center

Joseph E. Modrak, M.D. Strong Sleep Disorders Center

Michael R. Privitera, M.D. Mood Disorders Center

Faculty from the departments of Psychiatry, Pulmonology, and Neurology are involved with both the clinical and research components of our program.

Types of Training Available

Undergraduate:

 

Sleep Research & Sleep Disorders Course (Spring Semester, 2001); Volunteer Research Assistantships

Graduate:

Possible research associateship with stipend for graduate student in clinical psychology.

Thesis and Dissertation opportunities

Elective Externship at the Sleep Disorders Center-offering 1 day per week.

Students who apply to, and are accepted into, the Clinical and Social Division of psychology at UR can be designated as "our" graduate students and receive all rights and responsibilities therein.

Medical School:

3-5 lectures within the medical curriculum

Summer research fellowships

Elective clerkships

Elective rotations within residency programs (Psychiatry and Internal Medicine)

Internship:

Elective clinical rotation in Behavioral Sleep Medicine; Elective research rotation in Sleep Research

Fellowship:

One full-time fellowship

Types of Funding Available:

Agency: Grant Designation & Title: Investigator: Status:

NIMH MH39531 (R01) Is EEG Sleep Abnormal in Those At Risk for Depression? PI: DE Giles 2000-2004

NIMH MH60350 (R01) Familial Risks for Mood Disorders in Adult Offspring PI: DE Giles 2000-2003

NIMH MH56320 (R42) Variable Spectrum Light Field for the Treatment of SAD PI: DE Giles Pending

NIMH MH59392 (R01) Beta EEG Activity in Insomnia PI: ML Perlis 2001-2004

Searle/Lorex Long-term Intermittent Treatment of Insomnia w/ Zolpidem 10 mg PI: ML Perlis 2000-present

NIMH The Prophylactic Effects of Insomnia Tx in Recurrent Depression PI: ML Perlis Pending

Salzman EEG & SPECT Measures of CNS Activity in Chronic Insomnia PI: MT Smith 2000-2001

NARSAD CNS Functioning as measured by SPECT in MDD PI: MT Smith Pending

Current Trainees (Names and Email address):

J. David Useda, Ph.D. Intern, Clinical Psychology Jose_Useda@URMC.Rochester.edu

JaeMi Y. Pennington, B.S. Clinical Technologist/ Research Assistant JaeMi_Pennington@URMC.Rochester.edu

Misty M. Hill, B.S. Graduate Student, SUNY New Paltz MistyHill2424@aol.com

Henry J. Orff, B.A.. Lab Coordinator Henry_Orff@URMC.Rochester.edu

Patrick J. Andrews, B.A. Information Analyst Patrick_Andrews@URMC.Rochester.edu

James P. Soeffing, B.A. Clinical Technologist/ Research Assistant James_Soeffing@URMC.Rochester.edu

Michael A. Grandner Research Assistant/ Undergraduate bhofer@rochester.rr.com

Trainees who have completed training [in the past five years] and current status (Name, Title, Institution, Email):

Giles:

Michael L. Perlis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, University of Rochester Medical Center

Mark S. Aloia, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Brown University

Nancy L. Talbot, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Rochester Medical Center

J. David Useda, Ph.D. Psychology Intern, University of Rochester Medical Center

Laura Cushman, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Rochester Medical Center

Misty M. Hill, B.S. Graduate Student, SUNY-New Paltz

Michael A. Grandner Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Perlis:

Michael T. Smith, Ph.D. Senior Instructor, University of Rochester Medical Center

Natalie Smith, Psy.D. Private Practice, Stanton, Virginia

Jay Bohmler Medical Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

Amy Millikan Medical Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

Amy Park Medical Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

Elizabeth Kehr Medical Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

Laura Silverman, M.A. Graduate Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

Nora Ilniczky, M.A. Graduate Student, University of Rochester Medical Center

JaeMi Pennington, B.S. Clinical Technologist, University of Rochester Medical Center

James Soeffing, B.A. Clinical Technologist, University of Rochester Medical Center

Henry Orff, B.A. Lab Coordinator, University of Rochester Medical Center

Matthew C. Sharpe, B.A. Research Assistant, University of Rochester Medical Center

Lara O’Brien Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Kat Kirchoff Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Crista Crittenden Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Susan Archacki Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Juhi Pandey Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Michael A. Grandner Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Cory Clines Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester

Smith:

JaeMi Pennington, B.S. RA/Project Coordinator, University of Rochester Medical Center

Eman Moustafa, B.A. Graduate Student

Frank Zugibe, B.A. Graduate Student

Primary Research and/or Clinical Focus of Laboratory

Sleep dysregulation as a means of identifying familial/genetic transmission of major depression.
Early onset of depression and sleep dysregulation as independent risk factors for familial depression
REM sleep dysregulation as a contributing factor to mood disturbance.
Self-reported sleep disturbance as a primary factor in the symptom cascade leading to depression onset in major depression.
Beta/Gamma EEG & enhanced LTM around sleep onset & the perception of poor sleep in psychophysiology insomnia.
A multi-site study of behavioral Tx for insomnia and its impact on sleep, mood, quality of life and health care utilization.
Brain imaging in patients with insomnia before and after treatment.

Technical Capabilities of Lab

Laboratory  The University of Rochester Sleep Research Laboratory is located on the ground floor of the Psychiatry Department. The physical plant includes a two-bedroom apartment-like suite, four offices, a group room, a conference room and a storage room. The suite includes two bedrooms, control room, hook up room, kitchenette, living/dining room, handicap accessible bathroom and an exam room (for physicals and phlebotomy). The bedrooms are RF shielded and one of the bedrooms has an sound insulated catheter portal. The control room contains the electrophysiologic equipment, two computers dedicated to acquisition of PSG data and a computer dedicated to off-line data processing (sleep scoring, PSA & Statistical Analysis). The bedrooms are connected via intercoms to the control room and the bedrooms can be monitored via infra-red video. 

The laboratory is a state-of-the-art sleep laboratory that can also implement cognitive neuroscience and medical protocols. We can acquire routine polysomnographic data as well as a broad range of electrophysiologic signals (i.e., EEG, EMG, EOG, EKG, EGG, GSR). A variety of signal processing techniques (e.g., PSA, DPA, ERPs) are available. The location within the medical center provides easy access to medical personnel, to biomedical engineering, to clinical laboratories (e.g., Human Clinical Chemistries Laboratory) and to other research laboratories (e.g., Neuroimagining Laboratory, Psychoneuroendocrine Laboratory). For additional information on the laboratory & photos of our facilities, please visit our Web Site at www.urmc.rochester.edu/smd/psych/srl (last updated 5/01).

Computer Resources Thirteen computers (7 Dell & 4 Compaq & 2 Dell LapTops) with related peripherals (Read/Write CDs, 2 Zip drives and 1 scanner) support data acquisition, stimuli administration, data management and word processing. The majority of our computers are located throughout our facility. Our three premiere computers are located in the laboratory. All computers are connected to the local access network, to our common hard drive space on the URMC server (20 GIG) and to the internet. Our laboratory acquisition and scoring computers are Dell Optiplex Pentium III - 800 Mhz PCs. Each have 2 12 GIG Hard drives, 128 MEG RAM, 1 Read/Write CD, 32 Channel BSMI AD boards, and a 20’’ inch Sony color monitors. All PSG data are archived to 650MG CDs.

Office Space As indicated above we have 4 single occupancy offices and a group room for students. We expect to have 1-2 additional office spaces by this coming fall.

Support Staff We have one project coordinator, one lab coordinator/data manager, four technicians, two part time computer programmers, 1 part time nurse practitioner, 1 part time psychometrist (graduate student), 1-2 work study students and between 1 and 4 undergraduate volunteers.

Clinical Affiliation Our program is affiliated with a very active Sleep Disorders Center. This 5 bed laboratory has a patient flow of between 1000-2000 patients a year who are assessed polysomnographically (HealthDyne Acquisition System). Both Dr. Perlis (Director, Behavioral Sleep Medicine Service) and Dr. Smith (Assistant Director, Behavioral Sleep Medicine Service) are faculty at the Sleep Disorders Center.

Primary Training Focus

Human (Basic)
Human (Clinical Research)
Human (Clinical Practice)

Other Training Opportunities

To be determined - based on developing clinical/research program

Representative Publications For the Last Five Years

DONNA E. GILES, PH.D.

Giles DE, Kupfer DJ, Roffwarg HP, Rush AJ A controlled comparison of electroencephalographic sleep in families of probands with unipolar depression. Amer J Psychiatry, 1998; 155(2):192-199.

Giles DE, Hoffman NH, Kupfer DJ, Perlis ML Short REM latency predicts the first episode of depression in unaffected relatives of unipolar depressed probands. Amer J Psychiatry, submitted.

Zubenko GS, Zubenko WN, Spiker DG, Giles DE, Kaplan BB. The malignancy of recurrent, early-onset Major Depression: A family study. JAMA, submitted.

Aloia M, Di Dio P, Ilniczky N, Perlis M, Greenblatt D, Woods M, Giles D. Neuropsychological Changes and Treatment Compliance in Older Adults with Sleep Apnea. In submission: Sleep.

Talbot NC, Houghtalen RP, Duberstein PR, Cox C, Giles DE, Wynne LC Effects of group treatment in women reporting histories of childhood sexual abuse. Psychiatric Services, 50: 686-695, 1999.

Talbot NC, Duberstein PR, King D, Cox C, Giles DE Personality traits of women with histories of childhood sexual abuse. Compr Psychiatry, 41: 130-136, 2000.

Butzel JS, Talbot NL, Duberstein PR, Houghtalen RP, Cox C, Giles DE. The relationship between traumatic events and dissociation among women with histories of childhood sexual abuse. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, in press.

Gullion CM, Rush AJ, Roffwarg HP, Armitage R, Jarrett RB, Basco MR, Grannemann BD, Giles DE The effect of mood state on selected polysomnographic features in major depressive disorder: A state-trait analysis, in revision.

Giles DE, Hoffman NH, Kupfer DJ, Perlis ML Short REM latency predicts the first episode of depression in unaffected relatives of unipolar depressed probands. Amer J Psychiatry, submitted.

Zubenko GS, Zubenko WN, Spiker DG, Giles DE, Frank E, Kupfer DJ, Kaplan BB. The malignancy of recurrent, early-onset Major Depression: A family study. JAMA, submitted.

Giles DE, Kupfer DJ, Perlis ML Evaluation of the primary sleep defect in familial unipolar depression. J Affective Disord, in preparation (invited).

Giles DE, Perlis ML, Kupfer DJ. Early onset of depression and short REM latency are additive risks for morbidity. Biol Psychiatry, in preparation (invited).

MICHAEL L. PERLIS, PH.D.

Perlis ML, Bootzin RR, Fleming GM, Drummond SPA, Rose MW, Dikman ZV, Giles DE Alpha sleep and information processing, perception of sleep, pain, and arousability in fibromyalgia. International J Neuroscience, 1997, 89:265-280.

Perlis ML, Giles DE, Mendelson WB, Bootzin RR, Wyatt, JK Subjective - objective discrepancies in psychophysiologic insomnia: A neurocognitive perspective. Journal of Sleep Research. 1997; 6:179-188.

Perlis ML, Giles DE, Buysse DJ, Tu X, Kupfer DJ. Self-reported sleep disturbance in recurrent depression: preliminary evidence that insomnia may be a prodromal symptom of depression. J Affective Disord, 1997;42:209-212.

Perlis ML, Giles DE, Mendelson WB, Bootzin RR, Wyatt, JK Subjective - objective discrepancies in psychophysiologic insomnia: A neurocognitive perspective. Journal of Sleep Research. 6:179-188, 1997.

Perlis, ML, Aloia M, Boehmler J, Millikan A, Greenblatt D, Giles D. Behavior treatment of insomnia: a clinical case series study. The Journal of Behavioral Medicine,23(2)149-161, 2000.

Perlis ML, Smith MT, Orff H, Andrews P, Giles, DE. Beta/Gamma activity in patients with insomnia and in good sleeper controls. Sleep.  24,(1), 110-117, 2001. 

MICHAEL T. SMITH, PH.D.

Smith MT, Perlis ML, Smith MS, Carmody, TP, Giles DE. Sleep quality and pre-sleep arousal in chronic pain. Journal of Behavioral Medicine 23,1, 1-13 (2000).

Smith MT, Perlis ML, Carmody TP, Smith, MS, Giles, DE. Pre-Sleep Cognitions in Insomnia Secondary to Chronic Pain. Journal of Behavioral Medicine.24(1)93-114,2001. 

Perlis ML, Smith MT, Giles DE, Andrews P. Beta/Gamma EEG activity in patients with primary and secondary insomnia and in good sleeper controls. Sleep. 24,(1), 110-117, 2001. .

Smith MT, Perlis, ML, Giles DE, Andrews P. Behavioral treatment vs pharmacotherapy for Insomnia - A comparative meta-analyses. In submission: AJP.

www link for the Lab

www.urmc.rochester.edu/smd/psych/srl

Faculty Research Interests

Michael L. Perlis, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Rochester, Director of the UR Sleep Research Laboratory and Director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Service, Strong Sleep Disorders Center. Dr. Perlis is a member of the Sleep Research Society, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and he is board eligible for the America Board of Sleep Medicine. His research interests include sleep in psychiatric disorders and neurocognitive phenomena in insomnia and the mechanisms of action of sedative hypnotics. His clinical expertise is in the area nonpharmacologic treatment of sleep disorders. He has authored or co-authored several papers on the assessment and treatment of sleep disorders and published more than 20 empirical or theoretical papers on sleep related topics. Dr. Perlis current research includes: high frequency EEG activity in insomnia (NIMH) self-reported sleep dysregulation and the natural course of depression (NARSAD), REM sleep arousal as a mediator for mood dysregulation in depression (NIMH), memory processing in insomnia (Salzman) effectiveness of Zolpidem when used intermittently and long term (Lorex Pharmaceuticals) the relative efficacy of behavioral and pharmacologic treatments of insomnia (PI: M.Smith) effect of behavioral Tx for insomnia on health care utilization (Collaboration with Blue Choice)

Michael Smith, Ph.D., is a Senior Instructor of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester and a National Research Service Award Fellow. Dr. Smith is a clinical psychologist in the Strong Behavioral Health Adult Outpatient Clinic where he provides psychotherapy, behavioral medicine treatment, and psychodiagnostic evaluations for a wide range of patients. Dr. Smith has broad clinical training working in both inpatient and outpatient settings including working with older adults, patients with chronic pain, insomnia, depression, anxiety, and traumatic stress. After completing his pre-doctoral internship at the University of Rochester, Dr. Smith was a post-doctoral fellow in Behavioral Medicine at the University of Rochester Pain and Symptom Treatment Center where he provided evaluation and treat for individuals with a variety of chronic pain conditions including, fibromyalgia, back pain, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Dr. Smith earned his bachelors degree in psychology and philosophy from the University of Notre Dame and both his Master and Ph.D in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology, Alameda. He has specific research interests in the interface between sleep disturbance, emotional functioning, and pain conditions. His ongoing research is on 1) the association of cognitive arousal and insomnia in pain patients, 2) CNS hyperarousal as measured by EEG and SPECT in primary insomnia, 3) suicidal behaviors associated with chronic pain, and 4) sleep disturbance in recurrent major depression.